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Hospitals can reduce the risk of wound infection after surgery by making sure patients get the right medicines at the right time on the day of their surgery. These quality measures show some of the standards of care. Click here to learn more about how to prevent wound infections after surgery

The rates displayed in these graphs are from data reported for discharges October 2008 - September 2009. Timing of this information is based on release of information from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Green is for scores equal to or above the state and national averages.
Yellow is for scores between the state or national average.
Red is for scores below both the national and state averages.

 Indicator of QualityMaine HospitalsUS HospitalMDI Hospital
 

(See below for more data)

1. % of surgical patients given antibiotic within one hour before surgery 97% 92% 95%
2. % of surgical patients who were given the right kind of antibiotics to help prevent infections 97% 5% 95%
3. % of surgical patients whose preventative antibiotics were stopped at the right time 95% 90% 100%
4. % of surgical patients needing hair removed from the surgical area before surgery using a safer method 100% 98% 100%
5. % of surgical patients whose doctors ordered treatments to prevent blood clots after certain types of surgery 96% 88%   69%
6. % of surgery patients who got treatment at the right time to help prevent blood clots after certain types of surgery 94% 87% 73%
  1. Surgical wound infections can be prevented. Medical research shows that surgery patients who get antibiotics within the hour before their surgery are less likely to get wound infections. Getting an antibiotic earlier, or after surgery begins, is not as effective. Hospital staff should make sure surgery patients get antibiotics at the right time. Higher numbers are better.
  2. Surgical wound infections can be prevented. Medical research has shown that certain antibiotics work better to prevent wound infections for certain types of surgery. Hospital staff should make sure patients get the antibiotic that works best for their type of surgery. Higher numbers are better.
  3. Antibiotics are often given to patients before surgery to prevent infection. Taking these antibiotics for more than 24 hours after routine surgery is usually not necessary. Continuing the medication longer than necessary can increase the risk of side effects such as stomach aches and serious types of diarrhea. Also, when antibiotics are used for too long, patients can develop resistance to them and the antibiotics won’t work as well. Higher numbers are better.
  4. Preparing a patient for surgery may include removing body hair from skin in the area where the surgery will be done. Medical research has shown that shaving with a razor can increase the risk of infection. It is safer to use electric clippers or hair removal cream. Higher numbers are better.
  5. Certain surgeries increase the risk that the patient will develop a blood clot (venous thromboembolism). When patients stay still for a long time after some types of surgery, they are more likely to develop a blood clot in the veins of the legs, thighs, or pelvis. A blood clot slows down the flow of blood, causing swelling, redness, and pain. A blood clot can also break off and travel to other parts of the body. If the blood clot gets into the lung, it is a serious problem that can cause death. To help prevent blood clots from forming after surgery, doctors can order treatments to be used just before or after the surgery. These include blood-thinning medications, elastic support stockings, or mechanical air stockings that help with blood flow in the legs. Higher numbers are better.
  6. Many factors influence a surgery patient’s risk of developing a blood clot, including the type of surgery. When patients stay still for a long time after some types of surgery, they are more likely to develop a blood clot in the veins of the legs, thighs, or pelvis. A blood clot slows down the flow of blood, causing swelling, redness, and pain. A blood clot can also break off and travel to other parts of the body. If the blood clot gets into the lung, it is a serious problem that can sometimes cause death. Treatments to help prevent blood clots from forming after surgery include blood-thinning medications, elastic support stockings, or mechanical air stockings that help with blood flow in the legs. These treatments need to be started at the right time, which is typically during the period that begins 24 hours before surgery and ends 24 hours after surgery. Higher numbers are better.

Mount Desert Island Hospital; Critical Access to Quality Care Since 1897
10 Wayman Lane • Bar Harbor, ME • 04609 • (207) 288-5081

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